Tiny House #3

Spring is here and that means more Workaway helpers… so more work on projects.  It’s been a busy week!  We made the roof timbers and erected them…

Roof timbers in place

Eave linings are a pain to put in place after you’ve put on the roof or walls, so before adding any other cladding, we cut, painted and erected the eave linings.

Scott & Christoph measuring eave lining boards
Scott excited about eave lining!
Scott & Leif

The eave linings we done and it was 4.30 pm on Tuesday.  Rain forecast for Wednesday so I asked the guys if they’d mind pushing on with  the roof.  Everyone was up for it so we worked another 2 hours and put the roof on!

Steve and Leif fixing first sheet of roof insulation
Insulation lining under roof

Wednesday morning dawns…. and no rain!  Sweet!  OK, let’s put the window in before it rains…

Window about to be installed. Many hands make light work!

Still no rain, so let’s just carry on!  My brother had donated some off-cut iron from a building project and we reckoned it was about enough to clad the South wall.

Sizing iron for the South wall
On goes the cladding!
Thanks to Andy for kindly donating the cladding!

Now it’s Thursday morning, so we’ve got another big day today with extra helpers coming for the Tiny House skillshare.  Because I’ve got 3-4 helpers for the next few weeks, we’ll probably have 2 people working on the Olive House each day… so expect big progress.  Christoph leaves in early November and wants to be the first person to sleep in the Olive House.  Will we make it?  Dunno, but I better get out and get too it!

🙂

Tiny House #1

We kicked off the series of ‘Tiny House Thursdays’ last week.   The slab has well & truly settled down and is ready for something to be built on it!  We’re starting with the Olive House, so named because it has a lovely olive tree established next to it.

Christoph & I had cleared out a workspace at the front of the workshop.  Jim joined us for the day and we made some good progress.

After working out our plans, we started framing up the West wall, on the floor.

We needed to stack up some more timber (all salvaged from pallets)

Jim & Christoph carting timber from the back of the ute to the stack.

and there’s the glorious stack, with a tarp to keep it dry & shaded.

Here’s Jim positioning a noggin before hitting it with the nail gun.

At the end of day one, we had a West wall finished – which we can now use as a template for the matching East wall.  Sweet!

(If you’re free on Thursdays, we’re working on the tiny house every Thursday in September & October… let us know you’re coming, though, please!)

 

Can you feel it?

Spring is just around the corner…  I’ve got daffodils blooming in the paddock and the afternoons are becoming lovely to work in.  Mornings are still chilly and the ground is soggy underfoot, but there’s long sunny days coming!

Christoph & I finished the timber rack on Tuesday, which was the ‘best’ day of the week, according to the weather bureau.

Here’s Christoph getting the tools organised.

Small patch where the lock in the roller door used to be!

The zincalume capping along the front of the roof, shining in the winter sunshine.

This is a section of tank liner material, which we’re dropping down so that it provides weather protection but still allows access to the middle of the rack, in case timber gets jammed or needs to be shuffled side to side.   Probably some rain will wash that mud off and the drop sheet will return to black, although I don’t mind how it looks right now.

and there’s a great view from atop the timber rack roof… this is the resource processing and deployment section of the property.  🙂

Timber rack roofing

Just a quick post tonight to share the joy of recycling a roller door into a roof!  [Share this to all your buddies who are into The War on Waste.]

You’ve seen the construction of the mighty timber rack…  this afternoon we rolled up a ‘stripped’ rollerdoor (no longer functional or repairable), put it on the roof structure and tek-screwed it down… simple as that…

… instant roof!

looks great from under neath

Christoph put all the screws in and was justifiably proud of his efforts!

Permaculture moral of the story – observe the inherent qualities of an object, not just the label society puts on it.   A ‘dead’ roller door isn’t scrap metal – it’s a perfectly fine 2.5 x 4 m piece of steel just waiting to be re-purposed!