Can you feel it?

Spring is just around the corner…  I’ve got daffodils blooming in the paddock and the afternoons are becoming lovely to work in.  Mornings are still chilly and the ground is soggy underfoot, but there’s long sunny days coming!

Christoph & I finished the timber rack on Tuesday, which was the ‘best’ day of the week, according to the weather bureau.

Here’s Christoph getting the tools organised.

Small patch where the lock in the roller door used to be!

The zincalume capping along the front of the roof, shining in the winter sunshine.

This is a section of tank liner material, which we’re dropping down so that it provides weather protection but still allows access to the middle of the rack, in case timber gets jammed or needs to be shuffled side to side.   Probably some rain will wash that mud off and the drop sheet will return to black, although I don’t mind how it looks right now.

and there’s a great view from atop the timber rack roof… this is the resource processing and deployment section of the property.  🙂

Timber rack roofing

Just a quick post tonight to share the joy of recycling a roller door into a roof!  [Share this to all your buddies who are into The War on Waste.]

You’ve seen the construction of the mighty timber rack…  this afternoon we rolled up a ‘stripped’ rollerdoor (no longer functional or repairable), put it on the roof structure and tek-screwed it down… simple as that…

… instant roof!

looks great from under neath

Christoph put all the screws in and was justifiably proud of his efforts!

Permaculture moral of the story – observe the inherent qualities of an object, not just the label society puts on it.   A ‘dead’ roller door isn’t scrap metal – it’s a perfectly fine 2.5 x 4 m piece of steel just waiting to be re-purposed!

Winter building

Although we are in the middle of winter, there are still some great days for building.  It might only be 10 C but if there’s no wind and the sun is out, working outside can be fine.  Adeline from Singapore wanted to do some building work, so we decided to jump start the big timber rack that has been sitting idle for a few months.

We visited old mate Richard’s and pulled apart a heap of pallets which Adeline then painted:

timber rack Chestnut Farm Adeline Singapore WWOOFER

painted timber beams Chestnut Farm

On Thursday, Adeline and I fitted the last of the steel crossbeams on the timber rack.  It was going to be hard to do that after we’d roofed and clad the thing.

timber rack

Our trusty guides at the Weather Bureau predicted a fine still day on Friday, so I contacted Marty, who recently completed the Permaculture Design Course, and he came over to help.  He’s going to be building and wanted to practise… seemed a fair trade!

We had so much fun on Friday that I didn’t take any photos!  (Marty & Adeline did so I’ll add some of theirs later.)  We got all the roof rafters up; don’t they look pretty all painted white with their front ends lined up so straight!

Yep, I’m pretty happy with the line of those rafters… we fixed the two end ones then ran a string line between them to set the rest by.  Just like Jimmy would have.  If in doubt, ask yourself… “What Would Jimmy Do?”

We’ll put three rows of battens – front, centre and rear.   Last Friday, we only put up the first two pieces of the front row.  While we mucked about up top, though, Adeline did massive quantities calculations working out which sheets of recycled corrugated iron could be cut to go together with minimal waste… and then put up three sheets on the back wall – she loved getting stuck in with the grinder.  Not enough work with power tools for girls growing up in Singapore, me thinks.

This week we’re being hit by cold fronts and massive winds so the rack will sit for a few days – maybe some more progress next week?  If you want to help out or learn a bit of basic construction, let me know.  Extra helpers for a few sunny hours can be a great asset when it gets decidedly cold mid afternoon!